Real Estate and the Millennials-Attracting Talent

Real Estate and the Millennials- Attracting Talent Thanks for returning back to my blog on Real Estate and the Millennials. Today it’s about, “Attracting Talent”. So how do we attract millennial talent and how do retain them? I’m constantly searching for more data so I can pass on better information about the millennials. For the […]

Real Estate and the Millennials- Attracting Talent

Thanks for returning back to my blog on Real Estate and the Millennials. Today it’s about, “Attracting Talent”.

So how do we attract millennial talent and how do retain them? I’m constantly searching for more data so I can pass on better information about the millennials. For the most part I’m trying to be more effective in coaching them in real estate careers. In my research, with no big surprise, the data points to better communication as being the key element. I think one thing that’s become very clear to me is this fact; we as baby boomers created the millennial. We were the generation that gave awards to our kids for participation before results. We were the soccer parents that took our weekends to make sure our kids were exactly where they needed to be even when it required us to put our plans on hold. We were the ones that instilled in them an attitude of entitlement. It is what it is, so why are we surprised that their attitude of entitlement has manifested itself in the workplace? Is it necessarily a bad thing that they are who they are?

Millennials attracting talent If it was important for us to treat our children differently than we were treated, doesn’t it make sense that we treat our business subordinates in a way that we would have liked to have been treated? It’s just a thought. So we have to realize that, in the work place, we should continue on with that level of support and recognition that we willfully bestowed on our children and graciously offer that to our millennial business associates.

Already some of you have that feeling of crimson creeping up from your neck to your ears. Let me ask you this, do you want and need a business that works with the insight and talent of Millennials or do you want to stand your ground and find the 1% that will lose their soul for your cause? Looking back, now at the age of 53, I thought you could get ahead by losing your soul. Honestly I wish would have been more selfish.

Anyway, I’ve found this incredible youtube that explains a lot about Millennials. It’s called “6 Strategies to Connect with Gen Y/Millennials in the Workplace”. Watch this it is really insightful.

So I promised you that I would share a question and answer I had with my favorite Millennial, my son, about what would attract him to a real estate career. Here’s how that went.

Question: If I was trying to recruit you to a real estate career what would be the some of the top things you would be looking for?

Answer: The more I thought about it I realized that you are dealing with the “ask generation”. Whether it’s through people or the internet, my generation has gotten accustomed to always getting an answer to any question that we have so keep that in mind. As far as the real estate career question is concerned, there are a couple of thoughts that come to mind. One, the money and always being able to make more is a big deal. I agree with one article I read that hit the nail on the head when it mentioned that millennials work to live not live to work. We will never devote our life to only work. We want to show up, do a good job, get paid for it, then go home and enjoy other things. Unpaid overtime is a bazar concept that no millennial will ever be okay with and with a real estate career, that’s a thing that doesn’t really exist. I’d also be looking for places that aren’t going to be taking a larger portion of my commission if it can be helped. The reason millennials jump companies a lot, at least in my eyes, is people want to nickel and dime us, not offer raises, etc. So we will go somewhere else that offers us more attractive benefits or more money compared to other companies. Offering mentoring and help that leads to success and helps build us up and become confident in what we’re doing is huge. I personally want to know the ins and outs of everything I’m doing so I’m not reliant on someone else. Don’t know if any of that helps or not but those are a few.

That’s great insight. If you read this with an open mind, it just makes sense. Please comment on your thoughts and any insight you may have. Millennials please chime in. In short this blogger feels not only are you our future, but we will benefit from you greatly in the workplace. That’s only if we take on the responsibility to improve on our communication skills. Until next time.

Real Estate and the Millennials

Real estate and the Millennials Blog series by Rick Guthrie According to the Pew Research Center , in 2015, the “Millennial” generation is projected to surpass the “Baby Boomers” generation as the largest living generation. The Millennial generation is typically classed from the ages 18-34 or born around 1980 through 2000. This presents an opportunity […]

Real estate and the Millennials

Millenials how may we help?Blog series by Rick Guthrie

According to the Pew Research Center , in 2015, the “Millennial” generation is projected to surpass the “Baby Boomers” generation as the largest living generation. The Millennial generation is typically classed from the ages 18-34 or born around 1980 through 2000. This presents an opportunity to look at the way we as real estate professionals are conducting our business. Are we attracting potential first time home buyers? Are we communicating our value proposition in such a way that the Millennials are hearing it and understanding it? Do we know the struggles and challenges that a Millennial may have in the home buying process? Are we attracting enough young talent to the real-estate industry that can support our need to service this next great generation? The average age of a real-estate professional is 57 years old. So the answer to the question above is probably no.

Over this next blog series I’m going to be doing some research and strategizing on how we as real-estate professionals can not only positively impact the “Millennial” real-estate client but also attract and train “Millennial” real estate professionals.

Many researchers have found “Millennials” to have high levels of self-esteem as well as a healthy feeling of self-entitlement. They are extremely tech savvy and communicate through a wide variety of social media platforms and for the most part seem ambitious.

Some challenges include high student loan debt. Not necessarily bad credit but no established credit. There seems to be more of a trend of job and career hopping.

The fact is every generation seems to have or have had a very definable established pattern. This of course stems from who and how they were raised. What events in history have shaped their character and belief systems.

I want to spend the next few months on looking at this from a view point of, “How do I affectively create a value proposition that is attractive to the “Millennial” real-estate client. The average age of the first time home buyer is 31.

So let’s seek to understand the “Millennial”. This is going to be fun. Stick with me and blog you soon.